Welcome to the website of the cavitation and bubbly flows research group

at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota.
Image Gallery
Video Gallery

Please contact Dr. Roger Arndt for more information.



  • Artificial supercavitation in unsteady flow.

  • Ventilated cavitation behind a semi-axissymmetric disc with control fin. Note the necklace vortice upstream of the disc mounted in the floor of the SAFL Water tunnel.

  • Cavitation in the wake of a waterjet. Velocity of waterjet increases from top to bottom

  • Closure of an artificially created cavity behind an axissymmetric disc. Top: Re-entrant jet method of closure Middle: Twin-vortex method of closure Bottom: Quad-vortex method of closure

  • Simultaneous side and bottom views of cavitation on a swept OK-2003 foil at angle of attack.

  • Artificial cavitation under a model of a ship hull. Creation of this ventilated supercavity allows for a significant decrease in fuel consumption as well as an increase in top speed of the ship.

  • Cavitating (water vapor) vortices behind a cylinder mounted on the floor of the SAFL high speed water tunnel: speed is increasing and cavitation index is decreasing from top to bottom

  • Cavitation on a NACA 662-415 hydrofoil. Photo on left is an oil film visualization made in a wind tunnel. The photo on the right is an observation of cavitation on the same foil at the same angle of attack and Reynolds number. Note the existence of both surface cavitation (emanating from a separation bubble at 60% chord) and tip vortex cavitation.

  • Bubbles and droplets on a anodized aluminum surface. Top: Water droplets. Bottom: Air bubbles underwater

  • Comparison of phase locked photos of cavitation (left column) with numerical simulations of incondesable gas that come out of solution as a result of cavitation

  • Sheet/cloud cavitation created by a NACA 0015 hydrofoil at an angle of attack

  • A wedge-shaped fin partially piercing a supercavity. Note the partial cavity forming from the leading edge of the fin.

  • Axisymmetric ventilated supercavitation: ventilation increases and cavitation index decreases from top to bottom.

  • Axisymmetric ventilated supercavitation: ventilation increases and cavitation index decreases from top to bottom.